Saturday, January 4, 2014

Monday, 30 DEC 13: Introduction To My New Apartment

The plane literally followed the sun until it touched down in Misawa, Japan. Even though we surged into the next day (since Japan is a day ahead) it never got dark as I awaited since early that morning. Loosing a day is like loosing part of your life. I hope to regain that day when I return back to America...does that mean the Japanese live a day less than we or are they just born ahead of the game? Anyway, after landing everyone was escorted down the airstairs onto the landing strip. The wind was crisp and cold. A light sheet of snow covered the ground off in the distance. All passengers walked inside the small military air port and were briefed by a Sergeant on how to fill out custom forms. The baggage claim was right next to the door we entered in, so I grabbed my luggage off of the conveyor belt and walked toward the exit. My sponsor/supervisor was at the door and greeted me. We previously negotiated my attire would consist of my ABUs (Airman Battle Uniform), allowing myself to be easily spotted. Generally military members refrain from overseas travel in uniform to avoid any violence or complications from the military appearance. Since my flight landed in a military air port it was no big deal. Sergeant Armendariz lead me to his very peculiar car. The drivers seat was on the left side and the passenger seat on the right! The driving was different as well. Cars drove on the left side of the road similar to England. My supervisor drove us to my appartement and it was a pleasant surprise as well. Through the entrance doors of the building and down the cold hallway to the left near the far end of the hall stood the door to my appartement. What was revealed inside was more than I could have ever hoped for. I placed my jacket in the closet to my right as I walked in. To the left was the kitchen, oven, refrigerator, microwave, sink, and all! A wall with a large window looked into the living room. It was already furnished with a lamp, drawers, shelves, couches, ect. Another hallway lead to the bathroom with a nice shower and bathtub. My bedroom was next to the bathroom. A beautiful queen sized bed stood in one corner and an even bigger closet was at the foot of the bed. As I briefly mentioned before, it was more than I could have ever dreamed of! That was not all, Sergeant Armendariz bought food to fill the kitchen shelves. Pizza, coke, pop parts, gadorade, and noodles were packaged in plastic bags on the counter. It was a nice welcome to my new home (even if I didn’t eat those types of foods...I consider myself a more natural eater if you know what I mean). Still, I wasn’t about to complain! We drove to the hospital to pick up my in-processing checklist. Every airman is required to in-process whenever he or she PCS (perminant change of station) to a different duty station. There was no rush to complete this list, Sergeant said it would take a few weeks. The Multi-Servise Unit (MSU), where I was going to work for the next 2 years, was located in the basement next to the Urgent Care Clinic (UCC). Sergeant introduced me to my future co-workers and we stayed to socialize for a while. By then it was already 1pm and I was starving! Sergeant Armendariz brought me to the BX (military version of Walmart) to eat at the taco bell in the food court. His wife worked in an internet shop nearby and decided to join us. We ate at taco bell and bought me a burrito (how generous!). The hospitality couldn’t have been better. Looking at the prices taught me what the currency really was. The Yen is used in Japan and is about equal in value compared to the dollar (1 yen is equal to about 0.0095 dollars). As we sat there enjoying our late afternoon lunch A1C (Airman First Class) Panic came along. She was supposed to be my sponsor in the first place until the leadership switched me from working in the Urgent Care Clinic to the Multi-Service Unit. She still took me under her wing and helped me shop for bed sheets and a pillow. My supervisor said he would meet with up with us the next day. Soon enough, she drove me around base to give me a tour. Again, I was taken aback by the road laws and signs. The stop signs at intersections resembled an upsidedown triangle with a base white background and a red strip encircling the edges. Some form of Japanese characters indicated its meaning, yet it would have been unknown to me unless A1C Panic explained its description. Almost every moment I half expected us to collide with oncoming traffic. Driving on the left side of the road would take me a long time to get used to! At the other side of base we came across an air strip that intersected the road. A1C Panic explained that when a plane needed to take off cars needed to yield unless they wanted to get run over. She showed me where the gym, bowling alley, commisary (military grocery store), post office, and shoppet were. Most military bases resemble a small Independent community with its necessities all within a walking or driving distance. The Japanese section on base was fenced off for their use only. Even though the Navy, Army, Japanese military, and Air Force all shared the space on base they all kept mostly to themselves, especially the Japanese. In fact, the Japanese even had their own hospital! Depending on the nationality of a sick or injured person, either the Japanese or American hospital would take care of an individual (including ambulance service). On the other hand, it was still not completely segregated because I saw Japanese joggers on the side walks, Navy buying groceries along side Air Force, Army working out in the same gym as anyone else, ect. We drove back to the appartement buildings and went to A1C Panic’s place where I proceeded to contact and message friends and family for the first time since I had been on base. I was even able to skype my friend Adam for a while. The time difference showed it to be night in Wisconsin even though it was still sunny outside In Japan. A1C Panic and I walked to the building just next door to her friends house. The smell of freshly baked chocolate chip cookies hit my nose as I walked through the door and my mouth started to instantly water. Panic’s friends offered them to me and I ate 3 in 5 seconds. The first batch was great; the second was not so amazing due to their burned crispy state. Panic walked me back to my appartement, yet I didn’t want to go to bed right away. My goal was to adjust my sleeping schedule as close to real time in Japan as well as I could. To occupy myself I cleaned my room until I passed out. My second day in Japan was over and the next day was on its way with new experiences and discovers waiting to unfold.


No comments:

Post a Comment