Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Saturday, 4 January 2014: First Time off Base

Today was another slow day. In-processing would take a few weeks, at least, that is what my supervisor said. At the gym on base they had work out classes which greatly interested me. The people were really nice and the workout made me feel refreshed and think clearer. Ever since the day I left America I hadn’t really had the chance to hit the gym. Around lunch time I looked around my kitchen and realized that I didn’t have much food to eat. In basic training and during tech. school the military gave me a meal card to eat at the defac (dinning facility) on base. Since I was going to work panama shifts (12 hour shifts) my superiors allowed all the workers in the MSU (multi-service unit) at the hospital to receive BAS: money for food (instead of living on meal cards). Nonetheless, I walked over to the defac: a place always familiar and predictable. Someone from my Ready Start class was there at the same time. A day or two before we had orientation. The leadership along with finance, family and airman readiness center, and other people briefed us about information we had to know to survive and enjoy the base. It was also a way for the military to get our information (certificates, phone numbers, rank info, ect). Jake, the guy from ready start, and I ate together as newcomers without any awkwardness or prejudice. We were both trying to integrate into this new lifestyle making it easy to relate. He needed to go to an auto-body class and invited me along. If I was to get a car at any point in time I would probably need to go someday anyway. At the auto shop the employees showed us around for half an hour and explained the rules. They talked about subjects and references to cars I didn’t understand. My attention span lasted about 5 minutes and the rest was a blur. As we walked home we said our goodbyes, but not before introducing ourselves again. Remembering names was never my best trait. Jake’s acquaintances invited him to go to a Japanese curry restaurant called “Coco” off base. To my delight he invited me (I had yet to go off base and explore). Even though I was going to be the second wheel times 2 I said yes (when would I get another opportunity to go off base?). The restaurant was not even in Misawa as I soon found out. We drove for a good half an hour to get to the next town nearby. The restaurant itself was small and dainty. The menus were in Japanese with pictures of the dishes as an aide. I only started learning Japanese as of a few days ago. The menu was completely alien to me. Most of the pictures showed dishes with half a plate of soupy brown curry and the other half being the white rice topped with meat and vegetables. Jake suggested a plate including a cheesy hamburger with rice and curry. I had nothing to loose and decided on it. The waitress asked if I wanted 100, 200, or 300 grams of rice and what degree of spiciness in broken english. Just to be safe, I asked for one of the least spicy curries; I don’t do well with spicy. Everyone also bought mango milk, so I conformed to the group. Our communication with the waitress was pointing nodding with the occasional hai (yes in Japanese) and arigato (thank you in Japanese). When I drank the mango milk I thought I would die of amazement. It was the most delicious and peculiar drink I have ever had. Mango milk has nothing to compare to, yet it reminds me of thick liquid puree with a mango tang to it. At the register we all paid for the meals and did not leave a tip. Apparently, it is considered rude to give a tip to a server. It would be an insult to the owner to leave a tip since it indicated the customer thought the owner was not paying the workers enough. Again, the language barrier made it extremely difficult to understand the waitress. In the end I just handed her all the yen (Japanese money) I had and she gave me back the change. At the moment the value of the yen was only 8 cents or so more than the dollar. Next, our group drove to a nearby thrift shop. 

The store was mind boggling by its size and content. There was a Hodge bodge of everything including snow gear, video games, manga, cooking utensils, fishing poles, movies, ect. As I passed shelves of dishes a small cup with an apple painted on it with Japanese writing caught my eye. It was nothing special, yet I knew I had to have it. On the back it was priced for 50 yen (about 50 cents). 
This marked my first purchase of a cup since my arrival in Japan. Back on the road it was already dark. The roads were narrow and the street dark. In Japan they don’t have shoulders as they do in America. The country also lacked street lights besides the random lights near the toll roads. The Japanese are commonly shorter and drive smaller cars accommodating for the small winding roads. No time was wasted getting back on base. I wish I could turn the car around and go back through the town again and marvel at all the foreign signs and buildings. The group surprised me again by inviting me to got to a ramen place the next day. Many people told me noodle restaurants were famous in Japan and for good reason (they are among the best in the world). I went to bed feeling like I finally accomplished something...I finally had a glimpse of Japan.

No comments:

Post a Comment